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Employment

Will Welfare Reform Increase Upward Mobility?

One possible force for greater upward mobility is the welfare reforms of the 1990s. Hear me out, because I think the case is stronger than is generally admitted. We probably won’t know the answer for a few more years, because the oldest children born in the 1990s are only 25 years old today, and the youngest are barely 15 years old.

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The Big Lebowski Defense

The past two weeks have seen a conversation between liberals and conservatives around the decline in marriage and its relationship to economics and cultural change. My last column argued that while marriage has declined, men’s earnings have deteriorated little if at all, making it difficult to link the two. One reaction was a sort of theoretical contortionism where declines in male earnings reduce marriage while, asymmetrically, improvements in earnings fail to raise marriage rates. 

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House Subcommittee Raises Questions on New Union Election Rules

On Tuesday two National Labor Relations Board officials, Chairman Mark Pearce and General Counsel Richard Griffin, appeared before the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies Subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee. Members asked Pearce and Griffin about new rules for union elections set to come into effect on April 14.

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How to Fix Disability Insurance

In late 2016, right around the time we elect the 45th president of the United States, we are due for our first entitlement crisis in two decades

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Republicans Want a Better Life for You that Democrats Can’t Stand

With the publication of the House and Senate budget resolutions this week, the contrast between Republicans and Democrats could not be more stark.

Democrats want to take care of you. Republicans want you to get ahead.

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Why a Higher Minimum Wage Will Hurt the Poor

Gov. Cuomo’s proposal to raise the city’s hourly minimum wage from $8.75 to $11.50 would harm the very people it is intended to help - poor and low-skill New Yorkers. If the wage floor is raised, they would have fewer job opportunities and less chance of climbing the career ladder.

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Jobs, Jobs, Jobs—and Nothing to Show for Them?

If Federal Reserve policy makers were to look solely at headline labor market indicators, they might be tempted to conclude that the U.S. economy had finally reached cruising altitude. Yet nothing else has that '90s feel: not the pace of economic growth, not capital investment, not productivity growth, not even Nasdaq 5000. The juxtaposition of solid job growth and tepid economic growth describes what the current expansion lacks: dynamism and innovation. 

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Is the Decline In Men’s Earnings Behind Marriage’s Demise?

Over at Demos’s Policyshop blog, Matt Bruenig has a post up on whether the declining economic fortunes of men lower down the earnings distribution is behind the decline in marriage. I’m currently slammed, so I can’t give this the attention it deserves.

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Who Is Middle Class?

The American middle class, though often mentioned in political stump speeches and policy proposals, is difficult to define. President Obama’s pushed for “middle-class economics” during his 2015 State of the Union, but what exactly is meant by middle class? 

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Labor Unions Just Lost Even More Power

Gov. Scott Walker on Monday signed legislation that made Wisconsin the 25th “right-to-work” state. Residents of the Badger State will no longer be required to join a union as a condition of employment.

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