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Employment

How Occupational Licensing Harms the Young

Occupational licensing, the requirement that people pass tests to gain government permission to work, is making it harder for young people to begin their careers. By keeping young people out of certain industries, or by making it prohibitively expensive and time-consuming for them to work, occupational licensing increases costs for all Americans and limit opportunity for those looking to enter the field of their choice.

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You might have to think outside the box as work is scarce

Young people might have to think outside the box as work is scarce. Maximizing job oppurintuies in a sluggish economy may see many graduates becoming their own boss. 

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LA Cuts Off the First Rung of Its Economic Ladder

If Los Angeles insists on raising the minimum wage, it should exempt workers 22 and younger. Otherwise, the higher minimum will price teens and students out of jobs and prevent them from getting valuable work experience.

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Debunking The Great Gatsby Curve

The Great Gatsby Curve has certainly generated plenty of heat, but very little light. The measure of “mobility” used in the Curve — the “intergenerational elasticity” — worsens when the rate of growth in inequality rises. It is hardly surprising that a mobility indicator that also reflects inequality growth should be correlated with inequality.The United States has the same upward mobility rates as Canada and Sweden, despite the fact that the three countries have, respectively, high, moderate, and low levels of inequality. 

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The Left's Worst Inequality Bogeyman Attempt Yet

When adults’ incomes are compared with their own parents’ incomes at the same age, the median change between 1978 and 2005 was a 93 percent increase. Today’s adults typically have incomes twice as large as their parents had at the same age. Fully 83 percent of today’s adults are better off than their parents were.

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Education Reform That Works

In June, 3.3 million American teenagers will graduate from high school. Just 80 percent of them graduate in four years, a share that declines to 65 percent among African-Americans. Yet in the last 40 years, school funding has exploded. One reason all this spending has not brought better outcomes is that teachers’ unions are more concerned with protecting their members than with helping students.

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College Grads are Drowning in Student Loan Debt

This month, as 1.8 million newly-minted bachelor’s degrees are handed out, most graduates will be coming off the stage with much more than a fancy piece of paper. Seventy percent will take an average of $27,000 in student loan debt with them as they try to build their careers after college.

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Has Middle-Class Pay Risen As Much As It Should Have?

Even if rising inequality did come at the expense of the middle class (or the poor), there is a values question that is separate from the empirical question: should the middle class (or the poor) have seen stronger income growth? 

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How Government Debt Disinherited the Next Generation…and How To Fix It

Burdened with an obligation to pay government debt they did not incur, young Americans – those born between the early 1980s and the beginning of the 21stcentury, or millennials – begin life at least partially robbed of their birthright.

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CC

A four-year college is not the only path to a promising career. Community colleges offer low-cost training for high-paying careers in fields including health services and information technology. They can also be used as stepping-stones to four-year colleges, which often give credit for community college courses. Community colleges can boost economic mobility.

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